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TOPIC: Suffolk Medieval Churches


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Suffolk Medieval Churches


We in Suffolk have a fantastic array of medieval churches mainly brought on by the success of the Wool Trade in The Middle Ages.




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I am not a particularly religious person but I have always had an eye for architecture, and we in Suffolk, thankfully, are not lacking in this field. A church tower could take longer than 5 years to erect, the foundations are quite shallow as the load is generally spread over a wide area.

Consider this that all churches are built facing East-West, generally the Tower faces West and the Chancel faces West, they are often exact in their positioning.

Have a look at some of these churches in your area, look at it from different angles, check the proportions, the towers, naves, chancels, bench ends, fonts, lecterns, glass, sun dials, bells etc

If a medieval roof is still extant you will often find that not one metal nail was used, just joints and pegs, Needham Market Nave roof is a prime example. Look at the work of the carpenters, there are some wonderful carvings everywhere, the stonemason with those grotesque gargoyles or some of those beautiful fonts.

Then of course there is the glazier, those in Long Melford Church, this time the stained glass windows are an absolute joy, somehow the Dowsing Iconoclasts in 1644 missed these and just imagine what the other Suffolk churches must have looked like if as in Dowsings words 'I bra(o)ke down 1000 superstitious images' as he did in Clare Church, yes we have all of this within the county of Suffolk........... 





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Combs Church

combs church.jpg


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Walberswick

Walberswick Church 092.jpg



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Boulge Church is full of Fitzgerald Monuments, indeed there is a Mausoleum in the churchyard on the left of the photo housing the remains of the Fitzgeralds except for Edward the translator of the Poem The Rubiyat of Omar Khayyam from Persian into English who is buried in an adjacent plot. Visitors from around the globe make the pilgrimage here to this very isolated spot where finding St Michael's is an adventure in itself! smile.gif 






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